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All posts tagged: women

Press Release: Prosperity Together

JRF | Nov 16 2015 |  · · · 

Local Organization joins $100 Million Pledge to Create Pathways to Economic Security for Women and Their Families in America

Jeannette Rankin Women’s Scholarship Fund Joins the Partnership to Demonstrate the Collective Power of Women’s Foundations in Effective Grantmaking

Athens, Georgia—Jeannette Rankin Women’s Scholarship Fund, a member of Prosperity Together, a nonpartisan partnership of public U.S. women’s foundations, announced a collective five-year, $100 million funding commitment. The funding will create pathways to economic security for low-income women and their families.

Jeannette Rankin Fund, founded in Athens, Georgia in 1976, has helped 47 Georgian women and provided a total of 1,236 scholarships nationally. Currently, two women are receiving scholarships to attend Athens Technical College.

The Prosperity Together partnership will fund local programs with a proven track record in providing women with access to higher education, job training, and child care, among other supports. Prosperity Together made the announcement at the White House Summit on Advancing Equity for Women and Girls of Color on November 13, 2015, which focused on a wide range of issues including the barriers and solutions to economic security confronting millions of low-income women living in America.

While women account for 57 percent of the workforce, they too often occupy minimum wage or part-time  jobs, with little to no employer-sponsored benefits, and limited opportunity for growth and advancement. In Georgia, 19.7 percent of women live in poverty.

"Jeannette Rankin Women's Scholarship Fund has been helping women improve their lives through college completion for almost 40 years," Karen Sterk, Executive Director of Jeannette Rankin Fund, said. "We are encouraged by the potential of Prosperity Together to maximize our collective impact and significantly improve so many more lives."

Prosperity Together will harness the collective power, leadership and proven effectiveness of women’s foundations working together to ensure women’s economic security in America. The partnership will also issue a call to policymakers, business leaders, the philanthropic community and the public to understand that economic prosperity for all is guaranteed only when economic security and equal opportunity are guaranteed for low-income women. 

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Jeannette Rankin Women’s Scholarship Fund was chartered in 1976 and is named after the first woman elected to U.S. Congress. The 501(c)(3) charity provides scholarships and support for low-income women 35 and older across the U.S. to build better lives through college completion. Jeannette Rankin scholars come from diverse backgrounds, yet they are united in their determination to break the cycle of poverty, better provide for their families and give back to their communities. To learn more about Jeannette Rankin Fund, visit www.rankinfoundation.org.

Prosperity Together is a nonpartisan partnership of public U.S. women’s foundations dedicated to improving the economic security of low-income women and their families in America. Prosperity Together demonstrates the critical role and power of women’s foundations to drive this work in communities, state by state, across the country. For more information, visit http://www.womensfundingnetwork.org/initiatives/prosperity-together/.

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Advancing Equity for Women & Girls of Color Summit

JRF | Nov 11 2015 |  · · · 

The White House is hosting a summit Friday, November 13 on expanding opportunity for women and girls of color. The Advancing Equity for Women and Girls of Color Summit will focus on a range of issues including economic development, healthcare, criminal justice and vulnerability to violence.

"Some of the statistics about the state of women and girls of color are pretty bleak: according to a 2015 report by the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, a black female high school graduate makes about $2,200 less than a white male dropout and black women are near the bottom of earning across all levels of education."

Executive Director Karen Sterk will be at the summit in D.C. as part of Prosperity Together, a partnership of nonpartisan, U.S. women’s foundations. Click here for the live feed. ‪Use #‎propseritytogether‬ to be part of the conversation.

Read more from the Time article.

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Higher education’s multi-generational impact

JRF | Oct 28 2015 |  · · · 

"The sons and daughters of college-educated parents are more than twice as likely to go to college as the children of high school graduates and seven times as likely as those of high school dropouts."

Read more from the NY Times article by clicking here.

It’s been shown time and again that when parents go to college, it greatly impacts the futures of their children. Jeannette Rankin Fund directly supports low-income women 35 and older. But the impact reaches far beyond the individual scholars.

Nearly half are the first in their families to pursue higher education; the typical Rankin scholar has two children and lives on an annual income of approximately $21,000. After receiving the scholarship, 95.2% of Jeannette Rankin scholars earn a degree or certificate. 83.3% say that earning a degree has helped them and their families to become more financially secure.

A college degree makes a difference in a family's day to day lives – securing a career with good pay and benefits so they don’t have to worry about how to pay for food or gas for the car or when an unexpected expense come up, like a child gets sick. It also dramatically changes their long-term prospects – they’re establishing a family tradition of education, and conquering poverty permanently.

Alexandra, a Jeannette Rankin alumna, says: “My degree gave me the flexibility to be really present for my oldest and younger son, and both recognize the value of having a good education. I think what they learned in watching me spend 10 years going from zero education to a doctoral degree was that reaching a dream takes work, not giving up no matter what, and giving it all that you have. I gained a tremendous amount of confidence, and when the job market took a dive and I was laid off, I simply started my own research and program evaluation consulting business. I am making a good income, working from home, and choosing the clients and projects that make me happiest.”

Jeannette Rankin Fund supporters make these changes possible for women across the country. Thank you!

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Press Release: Georgia’s Gender Wage Gap Not Expected to Close Until 2055

JRF | Mar 12 2015 |  · · · 

Athens, Georgia —According to a new report released today by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), Georgia ranks 26th in the United States earning a C on women’s employment and earnings. The report finds that if progress continues at the current rate, women in Georgia will have to wait until 2055 to make as much as men.


In Georgia, women earn 82.4 percent of what men in the state earn. The report findings show that a typical working woman in the United States loses more than $530,000 over her lifetime due to the gender wage gap.


Women’s earnings vary substantially by race and ethnicity. The national median annual earning for African American women is $33,555, for Hispanic women is $28,410, and for Native American women is $32,000, while Asian women earn $45,000, and white women earn $40,586.


“We must make wages equitable for all Georgia women, because this will strengthen our local economies and help women and their families be financially secure,” Sue Lawrence, Executive Director of Jeannette Rankin Women’s Scholarship Fund, said.


Jeannette Rankin Women’s Scholarship Fund helps low-income women go to college, earn degrees, and enter the workforce. In addition to closing the gender pay gap, it is imperative that women are able to earn college degrees and living wages so they can become self-sufficient. Women who received Jeannette Rankin scholarships have gone on to become doctors, scientists, managers, accountants, professors, executive directors, and much more. Nine out of 10 Jeannette Rankin scholars are more financially secure after receiving their awards according to respondents to annual surveys.


The report on women’s employment and earnings in the United States is the first in a series of releases from IWPR’s Status of Women in the States: 2015 project. Throughout the spring, IWPR will release additional reports with state-level data on Poverty & Opportunity, Violence & Safety, Health & Well-Being, Reproductive Rights, Political Participation, and Work & Family. Since the first Status of Women in the States, the reports have been used to increase community and private investment in programs and policies that improve outcomes for women throughout the United States. Visit www.statusofwomendata.org for more information about the Status of Women in the States project and upcoming releases.


Jeannette Rankin Women’s Scholarship Fund was chartered in 1976 and is named after the first woman elected to U.S. Congress. The 501(c)(3) charity provides scholarships and support for low-income women 35 and older across the U.S. to build better lives through college completion. Jeannette Rankin scholars come from diverse backgrounds, yet they are united in their determination to break the cycle of poverty, better provide for their families and give back to their communities. To learn more about Jeannette Rankin Fund, visit www.rankinfoundation.org.

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Remembering Jeannette Rankin

Remembering Jeannette Rankin

JRF | Mar 03 2015 |  · · · 

To kickoff Women's History Month, we'd like to honor the hard-work and courage of our namesake, Jeannette Rankin.

Elected to Congress in 1917, before the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote nationally, Jeannette fought tirelessly for women's rights. In January 1918, she opened the first House Floor debate on women's suffrage, saying:

“How shall we answer the challenge, gentlemen? How shall we explain to them the meaning of democracy if the same Congress that voted to make the world safe for democracy refuses to give this small measure of democracy to the women of our country?”

After voting no to entering World War I, Jeannette lost her bid for reelection. She spent her time working for peace and social welfare by joining the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, founding the Georgia Peace Society, and lobbying Congress to pass social welfare legislation, such as the Sheppard–Towner bill and a constitutional amendment banning child labor.

With war looming, Jeannette ran for Congress and took her place in the House once again in 1941. She said:

“No one will pay any attention to me this time. There is nothing unusual about a woman being elected.”

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, a session was called to vote on a declaration of war. Her fellow members of Congress booed and hissed as she voted No and said:

“As a woman I can’t go to war, and I refuse to send anyone else.”

The war resolution passed the House 388–1. An angry mob forced Jeannette to hide in a phone booth and wait for police escort after the vote. She later said:

“I have nothing left but my integrity.”

 

After her term was finished, Jeannette continued to advocate for peace. During the Vietnam War, she led the Jeannette Rankin Brigade in a protest march that culminated in the presentation of a peace petition to House Speaker John McCormack.

To read more about Jeannette Rankin, click here.

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